Architect Antoni Gaudi is easily one of Spain's most famous artists, and his works are some of the biggest sightseeing attractions in Barcelona. A born and raised Catalan, Gaudi was also very religious and famous for his quirky take on Modernist architecture. While you probably already know that Sagrada Familia is a must-see destination, you may not realise until you arrive in Barcelona just how much Gaudi there is to see here! Here's our take on the best Gaudi sites to see, and how to make the most of your time in BCN without blowing too much cash.

 

NEXT Barcelona Tours - Free Gaudi and Modernism Tour


Free Walking Tour

Kelly Bryant


Our Gaudi and Modernism Tour is an excellent intro to the Modernisme movement, the city of Barcelona, and Gaudi himself -- and we swear, we're not just saying that. Meet some fellow travellers and lovely local free tour guides for a unique insight to the intriguing legacy of Barcelona's Modernisme movement.

 

Sagrada Familia


Sagrada_Familia_nave_roof_detail

Wikipedia


This is easily Gaudi's most famous work. Begun in 1882, the temple is actually still under construction. The building features 3 ornate facades, which you can see from outside the building, but it truly is worth the investment in a ticket to head inside. The lighting inside the temple is one of its most distinctive features, and you'll also be able to peer down into the crypt, wander through the cathedral's museum, and see the schoolhouse Gaudi had built for the employees' children.

Tickets: €15-29, depending on whether you get an audio guide, take a tour, and/or visit the cathedral's rooftop.

Free or discounted: There is a €2 discount for students and those under 30 (ID required); tickets are half price for students and those under 30 from 6pm to close on Wednesday, Thursday, and Sunday.

Good to know: Tickets -- especially half-price tickets -- sell out in advance. Be sure to buy online several days ahead of time to get your preferred time.

 

Park Guell


Parc_Güell_(Barcelona)_-_58

Wikimedia


Many may not realize that Park Guell is actually a failed attempt at a residential community. Gaudi was commissioned to design the public lands in the development, but things never panned out. One of the only houses ever built was the showhouse, which Gaudi later moved into. Much of Park Guell is open to the public for free, though the famous parts you've likely seen photos of require a ticket to enter (these are known as the monumental zone). From the park you can also get fabulous views over Barcelona; just be prepared for many stairs and hills from the metro up to the park.

Tickets: Free to enter the park; €7 to visit the monumental park, if purchased online.

Free or discounted: N/A

Good to know: The Gaudi House is not included in admission to the Park Guell Monumental Zone.

 

Gaudi House Museum


Gaudi House Museum


Kelly Bryant


When you arrive at the Gaudi House Museum you may be surprised to find a rather traditional-looking Spanish home without any of the usual trimming of a Gaudi project. The house was actually the showhouse for the Park Guell development and was designed in a much more broadly appealing style by Gaudi's right-hand man, Francesc d’Assís Berenguer i Mestres. The house now plays host to a (very) small museum with a few rooms recreated to look as they did when Gaudi lived here. While there isn't much to see, the museum offers a brief glimpse into the austere life of this religious and very private individual.

Tickets: €5.50

Free or discounted: There is a €1 discount for students and those under 30.

Good to know: Museum admission can also be purchased for an extra €2 in a combo ticket with Sagrada Familia.

 

Casa Batlo


Casa Batlo

Kelly Bryant


Casa Batlo, designed to resemble a dragon famed in ancient Catalan stories, is another of Gaudi's most famous works. While Sagrada Familia is Gaudi's magnum opus, Casa Batlo is more representative of the little bits of genius and whimsy that Gaudi worked into every project he took on.

Tickets: From €22.50

Free or discounted: €3 discount for students with ID.

 

Casa Mila / La Pedrera


Casa Mila

Kelly Bryant


Commonly known as La Pedrera, Casa Mila was Gaudi's last public work before dedicating his remaining years to the contruction of Sagrada Familia. The building is actually an apartment building -- Gaudi's way of satisfying several clients requests to work with him at once -- inititated by the Mila family. Fun fact: This building was the inspiration for George Lucas's design of stormtroopers' helmets in Star Wars.

Tickets: From €20.50 including audioguide

Free or discounted: €4 discount for students with ID

 

Shockingly, this is just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to Gaudi's works in Barcelona! Join us on a free tour to get a glimpse of even more Gaudi and Modernist works.  

Kelly Bryant